LATEST HEALTH NEWS – Daily Mail

Posted by on Nov 24th, 2016 and filed under Natural Products News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

LATEST HEALTH NEWS – Daily Mail

 

The Oculus Rift (inset) headsets will also be used to spot birth defects and allow parents to see the development of their baby from outside the womb, Brazilian researchers say. They can transform MRI scans and data into a life-like model of a foetus (left). Scientists claim it will allow parents to get realistic images of their unborn children (right), instead of blurry ultrasounds. The uses for this kind of 3D imaging are quite numerous actually. It can aid in better viewing and interpreting of MRI scans which can better inform doctors that will be performing any number of procedures, from simple hearing aids to complex brain surgery. The implementation of hearing aids in particular has helped the practice remarkably. This better visualization works wonders in it’s correct usage, leading to much better results. Check out the latest meticore review.

If you are ever in a medical emergency, then you should act fast and go to this urgent care clinic for immediate medical assistance and for those responsible healthcare workers in need of a job, then check out these registered nurse jobs. Lead researcher Heron Werner Jr, from the Clínica de Diagnóstico por Imagem, Rio de Janeiro, said: ‘The experience with the Oculus Rift has been wonderful.” It should be interesting to see how this innovation advances medicine in the coming years. With recent events making clinic and hospital visits a bit more precarious than before, online options are being explored. Doctors want to be available to people looking Online Second Opinion Options for Belly Pain as well as other ailments, not only to be able to help them but to prevent self-diagnosing and self-medicating, which could be even more dangerous. “Many easily cured diseases can worsen considerably if mistreated or not treated at all. Therefore we must use technology to our advantage so that we can make ourselves available and accessible to those that need our help.”

Also the latest trends, iv therapy. IV therapies are used to treat a multitude of ailments. Medical-grade IV vitamins (Vit C, B complex, B12, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and more) boost your immune system and decrease free radical formation in the blood, thereby decreasing cellular aging.

 

he pinnacle of evidence in healthcare. But with the ever-increasing body of literature, how should we organize updating them? Dr Sally Hopewell, Editorial Board Member of Systematic Reviews, discusses why updating systematic reviews is essential to the field and highlights the importance of the journal’s Update article type.

Sally Hopewell 

Image attributed to GotCredit

The decision to update a systematic review needs to be made carefully.

The number of published systematic reviews continues to grow and so the challenge of ensuring that they are current and fit for purpose becomes even more important. A study published in 2010 estimated that there were approximately 75 new trials, and 11 new systematic reviews of trials published per day – this figure is now likely to be even higher.

It’s widely accepted that systematic reviews have the potential to ensure best practice and improve healthcare by enabling users to make decisions based on the totality of the available evidence.

However, if we fail to keep systematic reviews up-to-date this could lead to healthcare decisions being made on out-of-date or potentially misleading evidence, which can have a detrimental impact on patient care.

This in itself is a balancing act; updating too soon may introduce bias, as trials with significant results are more likely to be completed sooner and published quicker. Updating also requires substantial investment in time and resources and so “ad-hoc” and untimely updating may be an inefficient use of limited resources available to prepare and maintain systematic reviews.

… if we fail to keep systematic reviews up-to-date this could lead to healthcare decisions being made on out-of-date or potentially misleading evidence…


 

Why should I update a systematic review?

The decision to update a systematic review needs to be made carefully. It’s important to consider whether the topic under review is still relevant to decision-making and thus worthy of updating.

For example, if a treatment is no longer used for a particular condition or if more effective interventions have been developed, it would be an inefficient use of resources to update that review – recognizing that sometimes these decisions are geographically based. Alternatively, if the efficacy of a given treatment has been well established, the addition of new studies is less likely to change the overall results and would again result in an inefficient use of resources.

If it is decided that the topic is still current and worthy of updating, the most common reason to update a systematic review is the addition of new research studies. However, other factors should also be considered, including the addition of new treatment regimes, population subgroups, new outcome measures, new study designs or data from ongoing studies, learn more about professional clinical research services.

Changes to the cost associated with the intervention under review and its importance to funders and decision-makers are also important factors to consider.

As the science of systematic reviews develops, so do their methods. As new methods of analyzing and synthesizing data become available, the methods of a systematic review also need to be assessed to ensure that they are still appropriate and up-to-date.

he pinnacle of evidence in healthcare. But with the ever-increasing body of literature, how should we organize updating them? Dr Sally Hopewell, Editorial Board Member of Systematic Reviews, discusses why updating systematic reviews is essential to the field and highlights the importance of the journal’s Update article type.

The number of published systematic reviews continues to grow and so the challenge of ensuring that they are current and fit for purpose becomes even more important. A study published in 2010 estimated that there were approximately 75 new trials, and 11 new systematic reviews of trials published per day – this figure is now likely to be even higher.

It’s widely accepted that systematic reviews have the potential to ensure best practice and improve healthcare by enabling users to make decisions based on the totality of the available evidence.

However, if we fail to keep systematic reviews up-to-date this could lead to healthcare decisions being made on out-of-date or potentially misleading evidence, which can have a detrimental impact on patient care.

This in itself is a balancing act; updating too soon may introduce bias, as trials with significant results are more likely to be completed sooner and published quicker. Updating also requires substantial investment in time and resources and so “ad-hoc” and untimely updating may be an inefficient use of limited resources available to prepare and maintain systematic reviews.

… if we fail to keep systematic reviews up-to-date this could lead to healthcare decisions being made on out-of-date or potentially misleading evidence…


Why should I update a systematic review?

The decision to update a systematic review needs to be made carefully. It’s important to consider whether the topic under review is still relevant to decision-making and thus worthy of updating.

For example, if a treatment is no longer used for a particular condition or if more effective interventions have been developed, it would be an inefficient use of resources to update that review – recognizing that sometimes these decisions are geographically based. Alternatively, if the efficacy of a given treatment has been well established, the addition of new studies is less likely to change the overall results and would again result in an inefficient use of resources.

If it is decided that the topic is still current and worthy of updating, the most common reason to update a systematic review is the addition of new research studies. However, other factors should also be considered, including the addition of new treatment regimes, population subgroups, new outcome measures, new study designs or data from ongoing studies.

Changes to the cost associated with the intervention under review and its importance to funders and decision-makers are also important factors to consider.

As the science of systematic reviews develops, so do their methods. As new methods of analyzing and synthesizing data become available, the methods of a systematic review also need to be assessed to ensure that they are still appropriate and up-to-date.

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